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Long-term Physical Exercise Improves Finger Tapping of Patients with Alzheimer's Disease

[ Vol. 18 , Issue. 14 ]

Author(s):

Linlin Zhao*, Guanghua Liu*, Lingli Zhang, Yuxiang Du, Le Lei, Xiaojing Zhang, Yilong Zhao and Deng Shen   Pages 1077 - 1086 ( 10 )

Abstract:


<p>Background: Alzheimer&#039;s disease (AD) is a chronic neurodegenerative disease that has been characterized by progressive development of long onset early disease with complicated etiology and may cause memory loss, cognitive impairment, and behavioral changes. Physical exercise may play a preventive role in AD. In the present study, we investigated the impact of longer-term physical exercise on the finger tapping of AD patients by comparing the finger tapping of AD patients and healthy controls. <p> Methods: In this study, 140 subjects aged ≥ 60 years were enrolled. Group A consisted of 70 subjects (27 males and 43 females) without exercise habits who were selected from Yangpu District (Shanghai, China). Group B consisted of 70 subjects (27 males and 43 females) who were selected from Minxing District (Shanghai, China). All the subjects were right-handed as well. The subjects’ data, including subjects’ age, weight, height, Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA), Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), and finger tapping frequency, were measured. <p> Results: The subjects were matched in age, weight, and height. The AD subjects’ MoCA and MMSE scores were noticeably lower than healthy subjects’ scores (P<0.001); besides, AD patients with exercise had significantly lower MoCA and MMSE scores than healthy controls with exercise (P<0.001). The finger tapping of AD subjects’ left hands was significantly lower than that of healthy subjects without AD (P<0.01), and AD subjects with exercise tapped significantly slower with their left hand than healthy subjects with exercise (P<0.01). Meanwhile, AD subjects with exercise tapped significantly faster with the left hand than AD subjects (P<0.05). The right hands of AD subjects tapped remarkably less than healthy subjects (P<0.01) with or without exercise. Meanwhile, subjects with exercise tapped significantly faster with their right hand than healthy subjects (P<0.05), and AD subjects with exercise tapped significantly faster with their right hand than AD subjects (P<0.05). <p> Conclusion: Long-term physical exercises can improve finger tapping frequency, especially in patients with AD. Finger tapping frequency may be used as an index to monitor the cognitive decline in ageing AD patients.</p>

Keywords:

Alzheimer's disease, physical exercises, montreal cognitive assessment (MoCA), mini-mental state examination (MMSE), finger tapping.

Affiliation:

School of Kinesiology, Shanghai University of Sport, Shanghai, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai, School of Kinesiology, Shanghai University of Sport, Shanghai, School of Kinesiology, Shanghai University of Sport, Shanghai, School of Kinesiology, Shanghai University of Sport, Shanghai, Putuo Hospital, Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shanghai, Putuo Hospital, Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shanghai, Putuo Hospital, Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shanghai



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